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Latest Posts:
Best Options for Handling a Fear of the Dental Chair
Posted on 7/13/2019 by Alyce
When we went into the field of dentistry, we knew one thing for certain. People would sometimes be afraid of us. They fear that there will be insurmountable pain with every visit, even routine checkups. If you come to the dentist and know that you will have work that has to be done, your anxiety increases. One thing we are taught in dental school is that many times, the anxiety a patient feels about the dentist is related to what they have heard from friends and also the fear of the unknown. Most people don't understand dental jargon. You may not realize how the tooth works, the role of enamel, saliva, gums and other aspects of the way a tooth is constructed and its relationship with the other parts of your oral cavity. You may not understand that your jawbone, gums, teeth, tongue, and saliva all work in concert to protect your oral health. Knowledge Is Power You have likely heard that knowledge is power and it is true. When you first meet with us, let us know that you are afraid of the dentist. We won't take offense; we are accustomed to it. Let us know what it is about us that you fear. If it is the tools, we will be happy to explain what each tool does. If it is that you don't understand what we're talking about, we will be glad to explain any procedures or questions you have until you feel comfortable. Remember that you are in control. If you begin to feel uncomfortable during a procedure, we can take a break. We can set up a signal before we begin that will indicate you need a break. You needn't fear us; we are here to help you....
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Is Brushing Your Teeth for Too Long a Real Problem?
Posted on 6/25/2019 by Alyce
For most people, brushing too long isn't the problem. Many of us rush the whole tooth brushing thing. We try to get those pearly whites as white as possible in the shortest amount of time. However, we realize that for every one of you short-brushers out there, there are long-brushers as well. Some of us are really in love with the feeling of clean, shiny, beautiful teeth. We don't blame you. You love getting compliments about your teeth. It's hard to argue with that logic of brushing leading to beautiful smiles. However, brushing your teeth for too long each day is not good for them. Did you know that? Keep reading. In Short, Yes, It's a Problem While people who don't brush long enough can damage their teeth, so can people who brush too long. In fact, frequent hard brushing of your teeth may cause as much damage as if you were neglecting your teeth in the first place. If you brush for too long, you may be scraping tooth enamel off your teeth, which act as your teeth's armor. Over time, your teeth can lose enamel and become thin and brittle. If your teeth are thin and brittle, they may break more easily. You could also be at higher risk of tooth decay, which is probably what you were trying to avoid in the first place. Two Minutes. That's It. Researchers have found that two minutes two times a day is all the time you need to devote to brushing your teeth each day. Two minutes means that each tooth will get attention. If you brush for two minutes with a soft bristle brush, using rounded strokes, you are clearing your teeth of bacteria and food particles- which was the intention of your tooth brushing anyway, right? After your two minutes, you can floss your teeth, and use a mouthwash if you choose. Remember, two minutes, twice a day will help your teeth be at their best. If you have questions about how long to brush your teeth, or about oral hygiene in general, give us a call! We always want to help your mouth look and feel its best!...
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How to Protect Teeth When You Get Sick
Posted on 6/15/2019 by Alyce
When you get sick, there is likely a lot on your mind as far as your recovery, but make sure that your dental hygiene stays at the top of the list. Even though you feel unwell, you still need to take steps to protect your teeth while you are ill. Don't Forget to Brush and Floss When you are sick, you probably want to stay in bed and watch Netflix all day. While rest is essential to a swift recovery, you can't forget about your oral hygiene. To protect your teeth, make sure to brush at least twice per day and floss daily. Don't Brush Immediately After Vomiting After you throw up, you may be tempted to brush right away in order to get that foul taste out of your mouth. However, this can actually harm your teeth, as vomit is highly acidic. Brushing while these acids are in your mouth could actually damage the enamel, so instead, rinse your mouth out with water. Wait about 30 minutes before you brush. Stay Hydrated If you are experiencing a sore throat, cold, or sinus issues, you may notice that your mouth feels dry. Staying hydrated by sipping on water throughout the day will both help your recovery and will protect your teeth. Dry mouth is a major risk factor for tooth decay, but keeping your mouth well-lubricated can protect your teeth. Rinse with Salt Water Rinsing your mouth out with salt water is another helpful tip to care for your mouth when you are sick. This activity will rid your mouth of bacteria and other germs before they have a chance to impact your gums and teeth. If you are recovering from an illness and are concerned about your teeth, please give our office a call. We will perform a cleaning and thorough examination to ensure your teeth are in optimal condition....
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All Posts:
Best Options for Handling a Fear of the Dental Chair
7/13/2019
Is Brushing Your Teeth for Too Long a Real Problem?
6/25/2019
How to Protect Teeth When You Get Sick
6/15/2019
Why You Should Expect to Drool More with a New Set of Dentures
5/25/2019
You Need to Make Sure Your Teeth are Healthy Prior to Whitening
5/15/2019
Eggs Can Give You Better Oral Health
4/25/2019
Easy Ways of Boosting Your Daily Calcium Intake
4/15/2019
Sterilization Methods We Can Use for Our Tools
3/25/2019
How Exercise Impacts Your Oral Health
3/15/2019
Bruxism Can Affect You for Years to Come if Left Untreated
2/25/2019
Best Restorative Options for Chipped Teeth
2/15/2019
Types of Implants That Can Restore a Lost Tooth
1/25/2019
Top Restorative Procedures For Your Teeth
1/15/2019
Where Do Dental Pit Stains Originate?
12/25/2018
Where Can Bacteria from Your Mouth Migrate To?
12/15/2018
Why You Should Look Forward to It If You Need a Root Canal
11/30/2018
What You Drink Can Ruin Your Breath
11/20/2018
Is Chewing Gum Actually Helpful for Improving Oral Health?
10/25/2018
Is Brushing and Flossing Different with a Bridge?
10/15/2018
Best Options to Drink for a Healthy Mouth
9/23/2018
Besides Flossing, How Can You Get Items Out from Between Your Teeth?
9/13/2018
Greens You Want to Eat for Improved Oral Health
8/30/2018
Good Oral Health Saves You Time and Money
8/20/2018
Signs Your Tooth May Be Decaying from the Inside
7/20/2018
How Dental Chips Can Ruin Your Oral Health
7/10/2018
Do Dental Bridges Need Any Special Cleaning?
6/23/2018
Do Canker Sores Damage Your Oral Health?
6/13/2018
Foods That Make Your Breath Smell Better
5/23/2018
Flossing Needs to Be Done Gently
5/13/2018
Is There Any Reason to Fear Having a Cavity Filled?
4/25/2018
How to Keep Dental Bonding Looking Like New
4/15/2018
CONTACT US
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Mesa, AZ 85205-4078
Call (480) 939-5818



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